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Full text of "Rapid Population Growth Consequences And Policy Implications"

TABLE 4
Fetal Mortality and Mortality among Children under 5 Years of Age by
Infant's Birth Rank, New York State, Exclusive of
New York City, 1950-1952
Fetal				Neonatal		Postneonatal		Early Childhood	
Infant's	Total		Rate		Rate		Rate		Rate
Birth Rank	Births	Deaths	per 1,000	Deaths	per 1,000	Deaths	per 1 ,000	Deaths	per 1,000
Total	436,045	6,928	15.9	7,002	16.3	2,247	5.3	1,462	3.5
First	135,882	2,252	16.6	2,107	15.8	506	3.8	354	2.7
Second	139,881	1,581	11.3	2,075	15.0	649	4.8	433	3.2
Third	84,393	1,301	15.4	1,345	16.2	481	5.9	295	3.6
Fourth	38,993	111	18.4	682	17.8	256	6.8	177	4.7
Fifth	17,366	396	22.8	354	20.9	137	8.2	79	4.8
Sixth and higher	19,387	636	32.8	437	23.3	218	11.9	123	6.8
Not stated	143	45	(314.7)a	2	-	0	-	1	-
- Rates based on less than 100 individuals are not shown.
aBased on at least 100, but less than 1,000 individuals; rate high but number of cases low.
Source: Chase (29, Table 6.4, p. 111).eaths are relevant here since environmental factors may be expected to be most important after the neonatal period. The variations in mortality rates by birth rank are shown in Table 4, in which the increase associated with family size is obvious.